The study discovers dye; straighteners may enhance the risk of breast cancer.

The study discovers dye; straighteners may enhance the risk of breast cancer.

Concerns about whether chemicals applied to straighten or color hair may cause cancer has revolved for years. The answers have been incoherent and indecisive. Still, a large new study revealed on Tuesday had some severe findings that women who applied permanent hair dye or straighteners or used straighteners to others had a higher risk of increasing breast cancer than women who did not apply those products. The link was explicitly evident in black women as their use of permanent dye was combined with 45% higher breast cancer risk, while white women faced a 7% higher risk. Straightener usage was linked with 18% higher breast cancer risk. The results point out that using hair dye and straightener could play a role in breast carcinogenesis.

According to the study, there are more than 5,000 chemicals in hair products along with those that can damage DNA or intervene with the endocrine system of the body. The chemicals can get into the bloodstream and can be circulated through the body, inclusive breast tissues. Recent research has found that the products designed for black women may hold higher concentrations of estrogens and more endocrine smashing chemicals. Some straighteners contain formaldehyde, which is a known carcinogen. All of it may be a severe factor for increasing the risk of breast cancer in black women. Still, the authors of the study don’t have the information on the exact straighteners and dyes that are used by women.

The study was expressed in the International Journal of Cancer, and these findings are based on data from 46,709 women filed in the Sister Study, named for the fact that all had a sister diagnosticated with breast cancer but were cancer-free themselves. The participants had a higher radical risk of increasing breast cancer, but the findings likely still apply to the general population. Dale Sandler, the chief of the Epidemiology Branch at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences has stated that they were not studying women who all have a breast cancer gene. As researchers studied the women for an average of eight years, they discovered 2,794 cases of breast cancer.